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Girl Genius Radio Theater December 13, 2014

Posted by stuffilikenet in Awesome, Brilliant words, Webcomics.
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A collection of breezy radio script readings by the Foglios and  various fans and acquaintances are available here. Go listen to them all.  I promise a very good time.

Fantasy Mashup May 4, 2013

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Today’s selection is from@gregent, who asked for a Mary Poppins/Borg mashup. Side note: I love Mary Poppins. It’s not only a fantastic movie (I’m sure the books are even better) but Julie Andrews has never been better than she was as Mary. I find her and Dick Van Dyke to be one of my favorite screen couples: very silly and surprisingly sexy.
In the most recent League of Extraordinary Gentlemen comics, Mary Poppins is either God, or an aspect of God. That should tell you all you need to know about how much writers and artists respect her.If you’ve got an idea for me, tweet @kellytindall (#warmupsketch) and if I like it you could see it here.

From http://kellytindall.tumblr.com, who makes the most fabulous warm-up sketches for his new webcomic Strangebeard.  He is convinced that Mary Poppins is an aspect of God (which, frankly, explains a great deal about her Her).

viruscomix.com December 5, 2011

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viruscomix.com

viruscomix.com is usually brilliant, always funny and rarely short.  This is about the shortest thing there, but I most strongly recommend putting his (her?) stream in your RSS reader.

Billy Graham October 13, 2011

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Billy Graham

Although I think Billy Graham may have been sincere in his beliefs, found this drawing to appeal to my twisted, sick, depraved, immoral and blasphemous nature.  It’s from a comic about John Wilcock (founder of The Villiage Voice), and his adventures in the underground world of the 1960s, available here.

Conversation Piece September 26, 2011

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This comic has a delightful discussion on LanguageLog.

From The List Which Cannot Be Named.

Subnormality June 28, 2010

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Subnormality is a fabulous comic which mixes social commentary with the flesh-and-soul-devouring hunger of the Sphinx, who is a recurring character (in fact, the only recurring character).  The author, Winston Rowntree, advertises it as “the comic with too many words”, so no screengrab for you, my pretties.  Just visit it and check out the archives.  There’s some marvelous, crazy stuff in there I promise you.

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Hadler June 22, 2010

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Hadler is the last name of one of my step-daughter’s friends.  She made a comic strip for him, which struck my funny bone, although I can’t tell you why.

<KENOX S630  / Samsung S630>

It’s probably due to this panel:

Hadler small

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More Cheery Than It Appears June 22, 2010

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Life's Pie Chart

This little graphic is taken from Virus Comix, which I find hysterical, insightful and dark.  My mother should avoid this too, but not because it’s crude, just DARK.

Edible Dirt June 14, 2010

Posted by stuffilikenet in Uncategorizable, Webcomics.
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Edible Dirt by Matt Rosemeir contains blasphemy, foul language, bad jokes about sexual practices, poor personal hygiene, baby hobos and uh, well, never mind.  It’s tasteless and foul.  Don’t read it.  Especially you, Mom.

I Laughed Really Hard When I Read This April 3, 2010

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Calvin

and then I cried a little bit.

 

Exciting update:

going off the meds

There.  I feel better now.

Artificial Flight and Other Myths February 19, 2010

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a reasoned examination of A.F. by top birds

Over the past sixty years, our most impressive developments have undoubtedly been within the industry of automation, and many of our fellow birds believe the next inevitable step will involve significant advancements in the field of Artificial Flight.  While residing currently in the realm of science fiction, true powered, artificial flying mechanisms may be a reality within fifty years.  Or so the futurists would have us believe.  Despite the current media buzz surrounding the prospect of A.F., a critical examination of even the most basic facts can dismiss the notion of true artificial flight as not much more than fantasy.

We can start with a loose definition of flight.  While no two bird scientists or philosophers can agree on the specifics, there is still a common, intuitive understanding of what true flight is: powered, feathered locomotion through the air through the use of flapping wings.  While other flight-like phenomena exist in nature (via bats and insects), no bird with even a reasonable education would consider these creatures true fliers, as they lack one or more key elements.  And, while some birds are unfortunately born handicapped (penguins, ostriches, etc.), they still possess the (albeit undeveloped) gene for flight, and it is indeed flight that defines the modern bird.

This is flight in the natural world, the product of millions of years of evolution, and not a phenomenon easily replicated.  Current A.F. is limited to unpowered gliding; a technical marvel, but nowhere near the sophistication of a bird.  Gliding simplifies our lives, and no bird (including myself) would discourage advancing this field, but it is a far cry from synthesizing the millions of cells within the wing alone to achieve Strong A.F. Strong A.F., as it is defined by researchers, is any artificial flier that is capable of passing the Tern Test (developed by A.F. pioneer Alan Tern), which involves convincing an average bird that the artificial flier is in fact a flying bird.

Now we know the goal, but what about the technical hurdles?  Our visions of the bird wing are becoming more accurate, it’s true, and soon we may have a full model of every muscle, bone and sinew, but even this is merely information.  There’s never been a realistic timetable of how long it would take to replicate even a portion of the wing, whether through biology, engineering or otherwise.  And even the most optimistic birds have yet to explain how we plan to accurately rebuild the delicate array of feathers that are essential to flight.  Do not misinterpret this pessimism as cynicism, mind you, as I do believe these studies are worthwhile, as we will learn more about ourselves and what it means to be a bird.  Replicating birddom, though, is almost definitely out of our reach.

Even if we were capable of completely achieving the above, how would we ever know if it was a true bird?  Where does flight really reside?  We may build a functioning, flapping wing, but what if the essence of flight is deeper, hidden within the cells or elsewhere?  We would only succeed in making a hollow doll that only gives the appearance of flight. If this is the end result, is it a worthwhile investment of our time and resources?

There are religious birds who believe God made Bird in His own image, and while I do not share in most of these beliefs, I do think there’s something to be said about the motivation behind creating Strong A.F.  Perhaps, as we are the only creatures on Earth capable of flight, we want to push forward past our current capabilities, perhaps even augmenting our own flying capacities if independent A.F. is an impossibility.  This could be interpreted as noble, but I would argue that there’s very little utility in replicating what nature has essentially perfected.  Why spend millions on an artificial flier when there are so many birds out of work?  Many weaker fliers have already lost their jobs to gliders; is it wise to rush to make ourselves obsolete?  A.F. research may unlock some hidden mystery about ourselves, and it may make the lives of some more comfortable, but at best, true Strong A.F. is a pipe dream and at worst a challenge to what it means to be a bird.

Roger Puffin, PhD

Professor of Sleeping with One Leg Up,

Massachusetts Institute of Flying

[lifted in whole from Dresden Codak.  I’m so ashamed]

Least I Could Do September 29, 2009

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Least I Could Do is another comic strip I don’t want my mother to read.  But it’s very funny, in a rude-little-boy sort of way.

 

That’s exactly why I like it.

asofterworld.com June 22, 2009

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This sick little comic contains the best almost one-line jokes I have ever read, at least continuously.  I am still working backward through the archives, where I found these gems:

"I thought a psychic girlfriend would see the real me.  And she did.  I just didn’t think she would call the police."
"Now my kitty won’t eat regular food. If I had known this would be such a hassle, I would have just buried that kid I found."
"I love you like crazy. If anything ever happened to you, I don’t know what I’d do.  Turn myself in, I guess."
"If at first you don’t succeed, run."

Mathgeek comix-XKCD June 8, 2009

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XKCD is a must read for geeks and protogeeks. 

Web Comic Featuring Ada Lovelace and Charles Babbage June 6, 2009

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Lovelace — The Origin tells the story of, well, the invention of the computer in the 1830s by Ada Lovelace and Charles Babbage (not exactly; you know it was never built not built until the 1990s).  No, really.  It’s short, slick and smarmy (in a good way) and I hope there are sequels and action figures and a movie deal, almost as much as I want it for Agatha Heterodyne, Girl Genius.

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Naturally, there’s more to it than just that:

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The Thin H Line June 2, 2009

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The Thin H Line is disgusting, sick and wrong, and completely hilarious.  Mom, do not read this.  The following is probably the least sick comic of the bunch.

imageSee? I told you. The Thin H Line became Sexy Losers, and may no longer be updated, but a lot of it was archived a while ago when I was surfing more and had free time (some years ago, now).

Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal June 1, 2009

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This is the most amazing and disturbing comic strip on the web (now that The Thin H Line is not available).

Web Comics That I Like (Part the First) January 10, 2009

Posted by stuffilikenet in Awesome, Books, Brilliant words, Science, Webcomics.
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Something I really love is (are?) web comics.  Dozens of fine artists and writers seem to be expressing themselves in delightful profusion and I find my list of daily reading material grows every week as I find more of them.  I would be hard-pressed to express a particular favorite except Girl Genius.

 

gg

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It follows the adventures of Agatha Heterodyne as she runs away from the mad scientist who rules Victorian Europe (except England).  It’s not all that simple; Agatha is a mad genius, too.  Oh, here: this will explain it better than I can.  Here are the links to Agatha Heterodyne, Girl Genius in Amazon’s vast, mythical warehouse:

Girl Genius Volume 1: Agatha Heterodyne & The Beetleburg Clank

Girl Genius Volume 2: Agatha Heterodyne & The Airship City

Girl Genius Volume 3: Agatha Heterodyne & The Monster Engine (v. 3)

Girl Genius Volume 4: Agatha Heterodyne & The Circus Of Dreams (v. 4)

Girl Genius Volume 5: Agatha Heterodyne & The Clockwork Princess (v. 5)

Girl Genius Volume 6: Agatha Heterodyne And The Golden Trilobite (v. 6)

Girl Genius Volume 7: Agatha Heterodyne and the Voice of the Castle (v. 7)

Girl Genius: Omnibus Edition #1 (No. 1)